Creative Routines

“We all have the same 24 hours that Beyoncé has” and its various iterations took the web by storm in late 2013 as the megastar became the figurehead of not only having it all, but being able to somehow do it all too.

How do creatives – composers, painters, writers, scientists, philosophers – find the time to produce their opus? Mason Currey investigated the rigid Daily Rituals that hundreds of creatives practiced in order to carve out time, every day, to work their craft. Some kept to the same disciplined regimen for decades while others locked in patterns only while working on specific works.

Creative Routines Poster

There are enough data to visualize a portion of the hundreds of creative lifestyles. Click the poster to discover:
Gustave Flaubert
Ludwig Van Beethoven
W.A. Mozart
Thomas Mann
Sigmund Freud
Immanuel Kant
Maya Angelou
John Milton
Honore de Balzac
Victor Hugo
Charles Dickens
W.H. Auden
Charles Darwin
P.I. Tchaikovsky
Le Corbusier
Benjamin Franklin

 

Design Highlights
Representing each day as a continuous 24 hour cycle invokes the ever spinning wheel of time, and more simply the face of a clock with midnight placed in the “12 o’clock” position and noon at “6 o’clock.” Colors mark major categories of activity – work, sleep, exercise, etc.

Creative Routines Legend

 

Thoughts
Comparing the routines of these creatives is fascinating. Some work in the early morning, some work better late at night. Many begin their day with coffee and use tobacco and alcohol. Considering that our modern concept of exercise was not developed until the mid-20th century, it is fascinating how many of these people spent their afternoons taking vigorous walks.

Beethoven vs. Mozart

Perhaps most fascinating, is reflecting on how you spend your days compared to these creative masters. Do you have a routine that helps you be productive every day?

Data are from Mason Currey’s book DAILY RITUALS. Order it from Amazon and learn more at Mason’s site. The original poster is below for link reference

Info We Trust is a data adventure exploring how to better humanize information. To learn more read the opening post here. The creator, RJ Andrews, is an engineer and proud Northeastern University and MIT graduate. Please reach out through facebook, twitter @infowetrust, or the contact page.

by InfoWeTrust

Original

 

 

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in History, New infographic, The arts

Stacking Up Best Pictures

Nine films are in the running to win best picture at the 86th Academy Awards – and they could be compared in many ways. They all feature incredible stories, great acting, and, well, it gets pretty subjective very fast.

Let us let the masses duke it out: here are the the nine nominees for best picture with their Tomatometer scores (both all critics and audience), box office gross as of mid-January, and their total number of nominations.

2014 Oscars Infographic

The gaps between the critics and the rest of us is pretty interesting. Some films (Dallas Buyers Club, Captain Phillips) have stronger agreement  than others (American Hustle). The Wolf of Wall Street is the only one with an audience score higher than the critics.

But don’t let me, the critics, or the masses of film goers tell you what’s best. Go to the movies and see ‘em for yourself!

Data from the Oscars site, RottenTomatoes & BoxOfficeMojoInfo We Trust is a data adventure exploring how to better humanize information. To learn more read the opening post hereThe creator, RJ Andrews, is an engineer and proud Northeastern University and MIT graduate. Please reach out through facebook, twitter @infowetrust, or the contact page.

 

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in InfoSketch, The arts

Disney Characters

Steve Jobs counseled Disney CEO Bob Iger to think in terms of brand deposits and brand withdrawals. Since 1937′s Snow White, enduring film characters have been Disney’s biggest brand deposits, and their success is most fantastically expressed with a dedicated theme park attraction in Florida at Walt Disney World. Track our favorite magic-maker’s Characters by the Numbers:

click for a higher resolution version

Story Points
Several plot points about Disney’s evolution can be inferred from Read more ›

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in New infographic, The arts

USS Constitution: War of 1812

The USS Constitution set itself apart from her sister frigates in the War of 1812 – sailing under three captains through adventures which  have forever since made “Old Ironsides” famous. Whether they be heroic victories against HMS Guerriere and HMS Java, or daring escapes, The War of 1812 made the ship the legend we love today.

Follow the Constitution through each major event and port of call – from her return to America in 1812 to the war’s end in 1815.

Constitution_War-of-1812

Design
The timeline of action the ship saw is read from left to right. Trace the vertical position of each event to the map at left to see where the event occurred – one dimension of geography (this time longitude) is abandoned in favor of providing time as the horizontal axis. To learn more about the design of this chart and catch up on Constitution’s adventures from its previous engagements please see the InfoWeTrust posts on the Quasi-War and Barbary War.

Info We Trust is a data adventure exploring how to better humanize information. To learn more read the opening post hereThe creator, RJ Andrews, is an engineer and proud Northeastern University and MIT graduate. Please reach out through facebook, twitter @infowetrust, or the contact page.

Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,
Posted in History, New infographic

Favorite Princesses

Who is the fairest of them all? Sorry Snow White, but Cinderella is by far the favorite classic princess according to Google Ngrams, which samples published books to deliver relative frequency of phrases:

Favorite Princesses Infographic

Favorite Princesses Cinderella, Snow White, & Sleeping Beauty

These three favorite princesses are today most associated with their mid-century Walt Disney films Read more ›

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in InfoSketch, The arts

USS Constitution: 1803-1807

Constitution was called out of ordinary in 1803 and recommissioned in order to fight against the collected Barbary States, leading the third squadron to the Mediterranean in what would be known as the First Barbary War.

CONSTITUTION Barbary War Infographic

 

Once again, one dimension of geography (this time latitude) is abandoned in favor of providing time as an axis. To learn more about the design of this chart and catch up on Constitution’s adventures from its previous engagements please see the InfoWeTrust post on the Quasi-War. Stay tuned to join Constitution on her heroic victories in the War of 1812.

Info We Trust is a data adventure exploring how to better humanize information. To learn more read the opening post hereThe creator, RJ Andrews, is an engineer and proud Northeastern University and MIT graduate. Please reach out through facebook, twitter @infowetrust, or the contact page.

 

Tagged with: , , , , , , ,
Posted in education, History, New infographic

Horror Monsters and Ngrams

Google Ngrams provide a fascinating peak at trending topics over time by allowing us to compare the popularity of expressions in published books. For Halloween this week I whipped up the following sketch of some of Hollywood’s favorite monsters:

Ngram Monsters Infographic

Thoughts

  • Popular vampire movies since the ’90s (Interview with a Vampire, Bram Stoker’s Dracula, Twilight, etc.) helped catapult our leading ghoul.
  • Zombies were a little late to the party (they were not part of Universal’s 1930s horror cast) but have definitely risen to icon status – the trend line has been moving since the 1960 cult classic Night of the Living Dead, but the impact of recent Zombie TV shows isn’t completely felt by the time the data runs out in 2008.
  • How much of the Mummy trend line is corrupted by Egyptology?
  • Is there any hope for our poor Hunchback and Werewolf? The Phantom of the Opera made such a weak showing that he had to left out. Don’t take it out on me Phantom – blame Andrew Lloyd Webber!
  • Is the dip in the 1960s due to the thriller/horror/monster genre being taken over by Godzilla and Hitchcock?
  • If you think Vampires are a big deal you should check out Witches.

Interested in hearing about what you see – and what monster you’re going as on Halloween!

Info We Trust is a data adventure exploring how to better humanize information. To learn more read the opening post hereThe creator, RJ Andrews, is an engineer and proud Northeastern University and MIT graduate. Please reach out through facebook, twitter @infowetrust, or the contact page.

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in New infographic, The arts
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 598 other followers